Islands

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Rottumeroog is an uninhabited island in the Wadden Sea and is part of the Netherlands.

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Simonszand

Simonszand is a sandbank between the West Frisian Islands of Schiermonnikoog and Rottumerplaat in the Netherlands. It is located in the municipality of Eemsmond in the province of Groningen. The sandbank was originally mapped as being an Intertidal zone in approximately 1811, but changed in later mappings to be shown as a Supratidal zone after it became larger and migrated seaward.

 

Simonszand

Griend is a small uninhabited Dutch island in the Wadden Sea, lying around 12 kilometres south of Terschelling.

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Simonszand

Engelsmanplaat, or De Kalkman which is its local name, is a small sandbank between the Dutch islands Ameland and Schiermonnikoog.

 

Simonszand
Zuiderduintjes is an uninhabited island in the Wadden Sea in the Netherlands. It is situated south of Rottumeroog, east of Rottumerplaat, and west of Borkum.

 

Simonszand

Noorderhaaks, also called Razende bol, is an uninhabited Dutch island in the North Sea, a few kilometres west of the Marsdiep which separates the island of Texel from mainland Netherlands.

 

Simonszand

Tiengemeten is an island in the Dutch province of South Holland. It is currently a part of the municipality of Korendijk, and lies about 11 km (7 mi) south of Spijkenisse. Before 1984 the island was administratively split between Goudswaard and Zuid-Beijerland. The name refers to an ancient area measurement; one gemet is comparable with one acre so the name means ten-acre island. Tengemets would be about 100 by 400 metres (330 by 1,310 feet), while the island is actually about 7 km (4 mi) long and 2 km (1 mi) wide. The statistical area “Tiengemeten”, which also can include the surrounding countryside, has a population of around 10. On 10 May 2007, the island was officially given back to nature; its farming inhabitants were relocated and nature has been allowed to work its way undisturbed. New nature reserves are rare in the Netherlands, and since its return to nature, Tiengemeten has become a real wilderness with trackless terrain, flowing creeks and gullies, meadows full of flowers and huge populations of migrating birds, including ospreys and egrets. Some of the marshy pastures are grazed by Highland cattle and other hardy animals. The island has cycle paths and tracks, and also a large earthwork which serves well as an elevated outlook post for birdspotters. Tiengemeten is free of cars and accessible only by water via a small pedestrian- and bike-friendly ferry which runs regularly on the ten-minute crossing between the small port at Nieuwendijk and the island. Alternatively, bikes can be hired on the island, particularly during the summer months. There is ample free car parking at the ferry terminal. Once on the island, Margerita Farm is a short walk from where passengers alight from the ferry, and holds an information centre, gallery space, café and toilets. Walking tours are available, and volunteers are on hand to answer questions. There are regular special nature-related events on the island; biodiversity surveys, open days and special tours. Notices are posted in local press and on websites.

 

Simonszand

 IJsseloog is an artificial island in the Ketelmeer (province of Flevoland, the Netherlands) used as a depository to store polluted silt. Most of the polluted silt was deposited in the Ketelmeer by the IJssel river between 1950 and 1990.Removal of silt soil from the Ketelmeer lake also aims to deepen the channel leading to the mouth of the IJssel (to at least a depth of 3.5 m (11.5 ft)), thus aiming to improve access to the river for navigation. During construction of the IJsseloog, a major concern was to preserve the water table and the environment of Ketelmeer. The polluted silt is to be stored permanently and without any risk of leakage. To avoid nuisance to agriculture, to local residents, and to prevent groundwater contamination, the silt depository was built in the centre of the lake and not on the coast. IJsseloog is also a target for recreational and ecological development. Two other artificial islands were created: Hanzeplaat and Schokkerbank. The dredgings are being stored in a man-made island depot in the middle of the Ketelmeer. One kilometer across and fifty meters deep, the depot is designed to hold 23 million cubic meters of sludge from the Ketelmeer and other areas. Construction of IJsseloog started in 1996 and was completed in 1999. The deposit can hold 23 million cubic metres of silt. In this capacity, 15 million cubic metres are intended for the deposit of silt from the Ketelmeer, with the remaining capacity available to hold silt from elsewhere. To prevent leakage, the floor of the depot is sealed with clay and the dike is lined with foil. The water level is held below that of the lake, to prevent pollution runoff. A port was built on the outer edge of the IJsseloog for delivery of silt. Once the depot is full, remediation will be done by decantation. Clean silt will be used to construct a new ecological zone, the IJsselmonding. The clean sludge that is released will be used for the construction of a natural IJssel estuary. A treatment plant began operating in 2000. Its processing station separates sand and peat from contaminants. Purified sand will be used for construction, and the remaining sludge is pumped to storage. When storage is full, the layers of clay and sand will be sealed, and the island itself will be used for recreational purposes. After that process, Nature will take over in the IJsseloog.

 

Simonszand

Goeree-Overflakkee is the southernmost delta island of the province of South Holland.

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Simonszand

Neeltje Jans is an artificial island in the Netherlands in the province of Zeeland, halfway between Noord-Beveland and Schouwen-Duiveland in the Oosterschelde. It was constructed to facilitate the construction of the Oosterscheldedam. After the construction a fun park with attractions and various expositions was built on the island, now connected to the shore through the dam. In addition part of the island is a nature reserve. The island was named after a nearby sand bank. The name of this sandbank has two possible origins. It could be named after a boat with the name Neeltje Jans, stranded on the sandbank. Neeltje is a Dutch first name (a diminutive from Cornelia or Neelie like in Neelie Kroes). Jans is a familiar surname (meaning a son or daughter of Jan). It could be named after a goddess of the sea, Nehalennia. The second stage of the 2015 Tour de France finished on Neeltje Jans on 5 July 2015. 
It has amazing waterparks,boat trips, aquarium, sealion shows, swimming with sharks and more.
Visit Official Site 

Deltapark Neeltje Jans

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